I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Learn more.

Can You Shave Australian Shepherds? (Solved!)

Generally, Australian Shepherds are a loyal, brilliant, and friendly herding dog breed that comes with beautiful double coats available in several color variations.

Their thick double coats help them keep warm during extreme weather conditions.

It also protects them from sticks and other dangerous materials as they herd things.

Additionally, these dogs tend to grow long hair on their feet and ears.

So, is it okay to shave Australian Shepherds?

Can You Shave Australian Shepherds?

Australian Shepherds by JoDi (CC BY-SA 4.0)

No, you should not shave double-coated dogs like Australian Shepherds.

Double-layered dog breeds consist of two coats that aid in protecting them against weather extremes.

The exterior coat consists of long guard hairs that shed water and protect the canine against ice or snow.

On the other hand, its inner layer consists of a softer undercoat that is exceptionally close to the skin.

It is responsible for keeping your canine warm and dry, especially during winter.

The undercoat grows really thick during cold seasons, preventing you from seeing the dog’s skin.

Unlike the coat of single-layered dogs that keeps growing over time, the coat of double-layered dogs only grows to a specific length and ceases.

As a result, when you shave single-layered dog breeds, their hair will grow back in no time.

However, this is not the case for double-coated dogs.

Why Shouldn’t You Shave Australian Shepherds?

Now that we have provided the answer to ‘Can you shave Australian Shepherds,’ let us discuss the reasons why you should not shave them.

Because Shaving Changes The Texture Of The Coat

First, shaving Australian Shepherds changes the texture of their coats.

Once you shave, you are likely to notice that their undercoat will grow pretty quickly.

However, their outer layer, which consists of long guard hairs, grows at a slower rate.

More so, when the outer layer starts growing, it mixes in with the fluffy and softer undercoat.

You will notice that the texture of the outer layer is Velcro-like and sticky, nothing like it was before.

As a result, when your dog goes to play outdoors, you will see all sorts of things, including sticks, grass, seeds, twigs, and seeds, stuck to his new coat.

Removal of such substances can result in a painful and stressful process.

Because Shaving Is Dangerous In Summer Months

Another reason why you should not shave your Australian Shepherd is that it does not help with cooling.

Usually, Aussie Shepherds shed their undercoat in the summer, allowing their long guard hairs to insulate and cool them.

Thus, the guard hairs provide cool air circulation near his skin and prevent sunburn as they reflect the sun’s rays from their skin.

Once you shave their natural coat and the fuzzy coat grows, it does not allow cool air near their skin, causing them to overheat.

The new coat also does not prevent sunburn as it will enable the sun’s rays to reach the dog’s pale pink skin, which is common among northern dog breeds.

Due to the dog’s access to UV light, there is a risk of developing skin cancer.

Will The Australian Shepherd Hair Grow Back If Shaved?

As mentioned earlier, you should never shave the Australian Shepherd.

However, you may have to shave him due to medical reasons.

If you shave your Australian Shepherd, you can expect his/her hair to grow back to minimal length at least in approximately three months.

However, since each dog is different, the process may take a shorter or longer duration.

For example, there are some dogs whose coats will grow to a sustainable length in 8-10 weeks, while others may take over six months.

However, their coat will never regrow back to how it was initially.

Sometimes, you may even notice that its hair may refuse to grow back in certain spots, a condition referred to as post-clipping alopecia.

Once the thin, patchy, and differently textured coat grows, the dog’s natural cooling and healing system remains altered.

Hot spots, also known as pyotraumatic dermatitis, can also be the reason behind bald spots on your dog’s coat.

Such conditions are a result of active inflammation of their hair follicles or hormonal imbalance.

Australian Shepherd Grooming Needs

Although you should not shave Australian Shepherds, it is vital not to forget about their grooming needs.

Basic brushing and trimming with the right tools aids in ensuring they look great as well as maintain a healthy and shiny coat.

Given that these dogs are moderate shedders, it is crucial to remove their dead and shedding hairs from time to time.

By using a long-toothed undercoat rake  and a good slicker brush, you can effectively brush your canine’s coat.

The process allows you to check for parasites as well as the state of your dog’s skin. Start with the slicker brush  and brush the dog’s coat in its natural direction.

Next, use the undercoat rake to ensure proper brushing of their undercoat. If you find any resistance or tangles in the undercoat, use the brush to detangle gently.

When it comes to trimming, you will not need to do much in the case of Australian Shepherds.

By using a good pair of thinning shears , you can cautiously trim the unwanted hairs on your dog’s feet, tail, legs, ears, and britches.

Gently brush the hairs on these areas in their natural lines using your slicker brush, and then trim the hair that sticks out.

Conclusion

Now that we have answered the popularly asked question, ‘Can you shave Australian Shepherds,’ you can now groom your dog correctly.

It is best to practice a weekly brushing and trimming routine for your Australian Shepherd to ensure their coat is healthy and shiny.

However, it is advisable to brush their coat daily during shedding season to prevent tangling and collecting various debris.

If you do not have time to devote yourself to a regular grooming routine, you can find reliable dog groomers to do it on your behalf.

However, be sure to give them instructions as it prevents them from shaving your Australian Shepherd.

All About Sheepdogs
Logo